Young Universe

Comets cannot be more than a few thousand years old or they would all have disintegrated.

Fast Facts

  • Spiral galaxies rotate much too quickly for an old universe. They would be twisted beyond recognition if they were really as old as secular astronomers claim.
  • The magnetic fields of planets and moons in our solar system are consistent with their age of a few thousand years, but are much too strong for an age of billions of years.
  • The debris shed by disintegrating comets is what causes meteor showers. Since earth intersects such a debris field once each year, most meteor showers are annual.

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Killing Sin (8)

 

Owen likens our lives to a garden and our lusts as weeds that choke our graces. “But now let the heart be cleansed by mortification, the weeds of lust constantly and daily rooted up (as they spring daily, nature being their proper soil), let room be made for grace to thrive
and flourish, how will every grace act its part, and be ready for every use and purpose!

Killing Sin (7)

The use of means for the obtaining of peace is ours; the bestowing of it is God’s prerogative.

The privileges of our adoption made known to our souls are the ways instituted by God to give us life, vigour, courage, and consolation. “The Spirit bearing witness with our spirits that we are the children of God,” giving us a new name and a white stone, adoption and justification, that is, as to the sense and knowledge of them, the immediate cause is the Spirit.

But this I say, in our ordinary walking with God, and in an ordinary course of his
dealing with us, the vigour and comfort of our spiritual lives depend much on our mortification, because this alone keeps sin from depriving us of the one and the other.

Every unmortified sin will certainly do two things:

[1.] It will weaken the soul, and deprive it of its vigour.

[2.] It will darken the soul, and deprive it of its comfort and peace.

[1.] It weakens the soul, and deprives it of its strength. When David had for a while harboured an unmortified lust in his heart, it broke all his bones, and left him no spiritual strength; hence he complained that he was sick, weak, wounded, faint. “There is,” saith he, “no soundness in me,” Ps. 38:3; “I am feeble and sore broken,” verse 8; “yea, I cannot so much as look up,” Ps. 40:12. An unmortified lust will drink up the spirit, and all the vigour of the soul, and weaken it for all duties.

Because it entangles the affections. It diverts the heart from the spiritual frame that is required for vigorous communion with God; it lays hold on the affections (lusts), rendering its object beloved and desirable, so expelling the love of the Father, 1 John. 2:15, 3:17; so that the soul cannot say uprightly and truly to God, “You art my portion,” having something else that it loves. Fear, desire, hope, which are the choice affections of the soul, that should be full of God, will be one way or other entangled with this unmortified lust.

It fills the thoughts with schemes as to how to satisfy the lust, so the imagination is defiled.

As sin weakens, so it darkens the soul. It is a cloud, a thick
cloud, that spreads itself over the face of the soul, and intercepts
all the beams of God’s love and favour. It takes away all sense of the
privilege of our adoption;

 

Killing Sin (6)

 

To recap: In Owen’s exposition of Romans 8:13…

1.The necessity of mortification (killing sin) unto life.

2. The certainty of life upon mortification.

3. The usefulness of mortification:

That the life, vigour, and comfort of our spiritual life depend much on our mortification of sin. Strength and comfort, and power and peace, in our walking with God, are the things of our desires. Were any of us asked seriously, what it is that troubles us, we must refer it to one of these heads:– either we want strength or power, vigour and life, in our obedience, in our walking with God; or we want peace, comfort, and consolation therein.

Owen continues under these headings:

  • The vigour and comfort of our spiritual lives depend on our mortification.
  •  The desperate effects of any unmortified lust; it weakens the soul.
  •  All graces improved by the mortification of sin.
  •  The best evidence of sincerity.

Killing Sin (5)

Continuing the adaptation of Owen’s work.

If this is the work of the Spirit alone, why are we exhorted? Why not let the work be left wholly to him?

Though it is his work he “works in us to will and to do of his own good pleasure,” Phil. 2:13; he works “all our works in us,” Isa. 26:12; he causes us to pray, and is a “Spirit of supplication,” Rom. 8:26,  yet we are exhorted rightly in all these.

He works our mortification in us  but we still must act obediently. The Holy Ghost works in us and upon us, but so as to preserve our own liberty and free obedience. He works upon our understandings, wills, consciences, and affections, agreeably to their own natures; he works in us and with us, not against us or without us; so that his assistance is an encouragement as to the facilitating of the work.

I might here bewail the endless, foolish labour of poor souls, who, being convinced of sin, and not able to stand against the power of their convictions, do set themselves, by innumerable perplexing ways and duties, to keep down sin, but, being strangers to the Spirit of God, all in vain i.e. they are not regenerated.

Knowing God as Lord

Excellent post. Great example of a believer acknowledging God as Lord would be Job…”The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away, blessed be the name of the LORD”

Young Calvinists

How can we know that God is Lord?  Do we know Him as Lord through the creation around us?  Through His revelation to us in His Word?  Through the earthly blessings we receive from Him?  These are all legitimate answers to the original question.  However, while they are probably the most obvious, they are not the only options.  One answer that particularly stands out to me is one that may at first seem paradoxical, especially in our current church world: we know God as Lord through His seemingly unfair actions in the world around and through His chastising of us.

For some time now, I have been working through the book of Ezekiel in my personal devotions.  One thing that I have come to notice is the frequent use of the phrase, “and ye shall know that I am the Lord,” or similar such phrases.  This line often concludes a…

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Killing Sin (4)

Continuing John Owen’s treatise.

How does the Spirit mortify sin?

1. By causing our hearts to abound in grace and the fruits that are
contrary to the flesh. Gal.5:22-23. “They that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with the affections and lusts.”  “By living in the Spirit and walking after the Spirit;” He causes us to abound in those graces which are contrary, opposite, and destructive to all the fruits of the flesh.

2. By a real physical efficiency on the root and habit of sin, for the weakening, destroying, and taking it away. Hence he is called a “Spirit of judgment and burning,” Is. 4:4, really consuming and destroying our lusts. He takes away the stony heart by an almighty efficiency; for as he begins the work as to its kind, so he carries it on as to its degrees. He is the fire which burns up the very root of lust.

3. He brings the cross of Christ into the heart of a sinner by faith, and gives us communion with Christ in his death, and fellowship in his sufferings.

Almug trees

Algum Trees and Wood

The use of algum wood when Solomon built the Temple is recorded in two places: 1 Kings 10:11-12; and 2 Chronicles 9:10-11.

During Solomon’s reign, more algum wood was imported than ever seen previously in Israel.  Algum wood was used to make stairs and banisters for the Temple and royal palace complex.  It was used extensively in the stringed instrument section of the Temple, e.g., in harps and lyres. The musical instruments were so beautiful that they were a marvel in Judah.  The almug tree yields heavy, fine-grained wood that is notably black on the surfaces yet polishes to a rich ruby or garnet color.  In addition to being strong, it is antiseptic which makes it impervious to most insects, e.g., termites, as no insects will live inside the wood.

The algum tree of the Bible was from the Pterocarpus santalinus known as red sandalwood, Red Saunders and Red Sanders.  Sandalwood is native to southern India and does not naturally grow in Israel.  The algum is a deciduous tree between 33-65 feet tall.  The red sandalwood is considered endangered because its natural habitat in India is subjected to human encroachment. The algum tree has a number of useful products.  The hard, heavy heart wood can be used for carpentry and for fence posts.  Bark and stems are made into a red dye which gives a deep ruby red color to silken and woolen clothes.  Currently, the dye is used as a brightening substance in tea mixtures and a coloring agent in toothpaste.