Comfort in death

Limerick Reformed Fellowship

Give unto the LORD the glory due unto His name (Psalm 96:8)

www.limerickreformed.com

Live Broadcast: http://mixlr.com/limerickreformed/

Lord’s Day 1st January 2017

Order of Service

Missionary-Pastor Martyn McGeown

 

 

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Evening worship – 5.30pm

Our Confession of Life After Death

Scripture Reading: Psalm 16:1-11

Text:  Heidelberg Catechism, LD 22, Q&A 57

  1. Temporary Separation
  2. Immediate Joy

III. Future Glory

Psalms: 73:23-28; 107:16-21; 16:1-5; 16:6-11

 

Quotes to Consider

Calvin: “Though many talk much of God’s providence, and profess to believe that he exercises a special guardianship over his own children, few are found actually willing to entrust their safety to him” (Commentary on the Psalms, vol. 2, p. 477).

 

  1. H. Spurgeon: “This is noble encouragement to all the saints; die they must, but rise they shall, and though in their case they shall see corruption, yet they shall rise to everlasting life. Christ’s resurrection is the cause, the earnest, the guarantee, and the emblem of the rising of all his people. Let them, therefore, go to their graves as to their beds, resting their flesh among the clods as they now do upon their couches” (Treasury of David, vol. 1, p. 197).

 

Spurgeon: “Trapp’s note on the heavenly verse which closes the Psalm is a sweet morsel, which may serve for a contemplation, and yield a foretaste of our inheritance. He writes, ‘Here is as much said as can be, but words are too weak to utter it. For quality there is in heaven joy and pleasures; for quantity, a fullness, a torrent whereat they drink without let or loathing; for constancy, it is at God’s right hand, who is stronger than all, neither can any take us out of his hand; it is a constant happiness without intermission: and for perpetuity it is for evermore. Heaven’s joys are without measure, mixture, or end'” (ibid, p. 197).

 

Edward Willan: “‘In thy presence is the fullness of joy;’ and herein consists the consummation of felicity; for what does any man here present wish for more than joy? And what measure of joy can any man wish for more than fullness of joy? And what kind of fullness would any man wish for rather than this fullness? And where would any man wish to enjoy this fullness of joy rather than in the presence of God, which is the ever-flowing and the over-flowing fountain of joy? And when would any man wish for this enjoyment of the fullness of joy in the very fountain of joy rather than presently, constantly, and incessantly? Now all these desirables are encircled within the compass of the first remarkable, to make up the consummation of true felicity. ‘In thy presence is fullness of joy’” (quoted in ibid, p. 211).

 

John Cragg: “This then may serve for a ground of comfort to every soul distressed with the tedious bitterness of this life; for short sorrow here, we shall have eternal joy; for a little hunger, an eternal banquet; for light sickness and affliction, everlasting health and salvation; for a little imprisonment, endless liberty; for disgrace, glory. Instead of the wicked who oppress and afflict them, they shall have the angels and saints to comfort and solace them, instead of Satan to torment and tempt them, they shall have Jesus to ravish and affect them. Joseph’s prison shall be turned into a palace; Daniel’s lions’ den into the presence of the Lion of the Tribe of Judah; the three children’s hot fiery furnace, into the new Jerusalem of pure gold; David’s Gath, into the tabernacle of the living God” (quoted in ibid, p. 212).

 

Zacharias Ursinus: “Flesh and blood being mortal and corrupt, as it now is, cannot inherit the kingdom of God. Therefore flesh and blood, simply such, cannot inherit the kingdom of God. But this does not legitimately follow. Hence flesh and blood, understanding by this, that which is sinful, and corrupt, cannot inherit the kingdom of God; but as glorified and immortal it shall obtain an entrance there. The Apostle expressly teaches this when he says, ‘It is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body.’ … The apostle means by a spiritual body, not that which is changed into the Spirit, or which is in all its properties equal to the Spirit, but that which is ruled by the Spirit of God, which is immortal and free from all misery, adorned with heavenly splendour, glory, activity, strength and holiness. So he also calls a natural body, not that which is changed into the soul, or which is equal to it in all its properties, but that which in this mortal state is quickened, controlled, and directed by the soul. That this is the meaning of what Paul calls a spiritual body, is proven. 1. Because he says it is raised a spiritual body, but a spirit is no body. 2. He also adds, ‘this corruptible (body) must put on incorruption'” (Commentary on the Heidelberg Catechism, pp. 315-316).

 

 

Heidelberg Catechism, LD 22

Q 57.  What comfort doth the “resurrection of the body” afford thee?
 A.  That not only my soul after this life shall be immediately taken up to Christ its Head; but also, that this my body, being raised by the power of Christ, shall be reunited with my soul, and made like unto the glorious body of Christ.

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