Song of Solomon 7:4b

thy nose [is] as the tower of Lebanon, which looketh towards Damascus;

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a tower on that part of Mount Lebanon which faced Damascus, which lay in a plain, and so open to view, as well as exposed to winds;  that from thence might be numbered the houses in Damascus: by which also may be meant the ministers of the word; nor need it seem strange that the same should be expressed by different metaphors, since the work of ministers is of different parts; who, as they are as eyes to see, so like the nose to smell; and having a spiritual discerning of Gospel truths, both savour them themselves, and diffuse the savour of them to others; and are both the ornament and defence of the church: the former is signified by the “nose”, which is an ornament of the face, and the latter by the “tower of Lebanon”, and this is looking towards Damascus, the inhabitants of which were always enemies to the people of Israel; and so may denote the vigilance and courage of faithful ministers, who watch the church’s enemies, and their motions, and, with a manful courage, face and attack them (see also Isaiah 1 and Jeremiah 1). Moody Stuart gives the example of the apostles in Acts 4:13 as a good example. Moreover, this description may respect the majesty and magnanimity of the church herself; the former may be intimated by her nose, which, when of a good size, and well proportioned, adds much grace and majesty to the countenance; and the latter by its being compared to the impregnable tower of Lebanon, looking towards Damascus, signifying that she was not afraid to look her worst enemies in the face: or the whole may express her prudence and discretion in spiritual things (Heb.5:12): by which she can distinguish truth from error, and espy dangers afar off, and guard against them.

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